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HUNTERDON COUNTY HEALTH
 
MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL SERVICES:
WEST NILE VIRUS
About WNV
Should Hunterdon Be Concerned about WNV?
Staying Ahead of WNV
West Nile & Mosquito Spray Schedule
Commonly Used Pesticdes
 
BLACK FLY CONTROL
Black Fly (Gnat) Treatment Schedule
Black Fly (Gnat) Survey
 
BED BUGS
Guidelines for the Prevention and Control
Las Chinches De Cama
Photographs of Bed Bugs and Bed Bug Bites
 
 

The Web Hunterdon
 

George F. Wagner, Director of Public Safety
Karen B. DeMarco, Health Officer
Tadhgh Rainey, Division Head - Health

908-788-1351
health@co.hunterdon.nj.us

314 State Route 12
County Complex, Building #1
Flemington, NJ 08822-2900


 

WELCOME TO THE HUNTERDON COUNTY
DIVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES - MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL

 

Should Hunterdon Be Concerned About West Nile Virus?

Mosquito


WHAT IS WEST NILE VIRUS?

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne virus which can cause West Nile encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Although this virus is commonly found in Africa, West Asia and the Middle East, it is believed that the virus appeared in the eastern United States sometime in the summer of 1999. It is closely related to the St. Louis encephalitis virus commonly found in the southeastern and mid-western U.S., and only rarely in the northeast.

Prior to August of 1999, WNV had never been reported in the U.S. In 1999, 62 cases of severe disease occurred in the New York City area, resulting in 7 deaths.

Because of this recent outbreak, public health and mosquito control professionals have heightened surveillance efforts to determine the most effective methods of mosquito control.

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HOW IS WEST NILE VIRUS TRANSMITTED?

Culex PipiensWNV is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito, primarily a species called ‘Culex pipiens’. This type of mosquito is most often found in urban and suburban communities, and is commonly referred to as the ‘northern house mosquito.’

West Nile Virus appears to circulate in wild bird populations.

When a mosquito feeds on an infected bird, it becomes capable of transmitting the WNV to humans and animals while biting to take its next blood meal.

The virus is injected into the host, where it may then multiply and cause illness. Infected mosquitoes were the cause of the recent outbreak in the New York City area.

WNV is NOT transmitted from person-to-person, nor is there evidence indicating transmission from an infected bird to humans.

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WHAT HAPPENS IF A PERSON IS INFECTED?

The virus has an incubation period of 5— 15 days. Most infections are mild and can result in flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache and body aches. Swollen lymph glands may also develop, and in approximately one-half of the cases, a skin rash may occur, spreading from the trunk of the body to the extremities and the head. A more severe infection can be marked by high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, tremor, muscle weakness, and rarely, death. The virus interferes with normal central nervous system functioning and causes inflammation and swelling of the brain tissue.

Anyone residing in an area where the virus has been identified is at risk of getting an infection. Those older than 50 years of age have the highest risk for severe disease. The case-fatality rate is highest in the elderly or those with compromised immune systems.

There is no specific treatment for WNV, nor is there a vaccine. In severe cases, intensive supportive therapy is needed, including hospitalization, intravenous fluids and nutrition, airway management, prevention of secondary infections and good nursing care.

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WHAT ABOUT OTHER ANIMALS?

American CrowIt appears that most birds do not normally show signs of infection with WNV. They do however, serve as natural reservoirs of the virus, and can pass the virus to feeding mosquitoes. During the New York area outbreak however, there was a large die-off of American crows. This was seen in many counties in New Jersey, and as far west as Hunterdon County, where two infected crows were identified. Other species of birds, including red tail hawks and blue jays, have been reported to show signs of Illness ranging from encephalitis to death.

HorseDomestic animals such as dogs and cats do not appear to be at special risk of infection however, the virus was isolated from one feral cat in Union County, NJ. It is possible that pets could become infected by eating dead infected birds, but this is still unproven. Infected animals should receive standard veterinary care. Full recovery from the infection is likely.

Data suggest that while horses are susceptible to WNV, most will recover from the infection. However, federal investigations determined that WNV was responsible for several deaths of horses on Long Island in 1999. Horses become infected in the same way humans do, from the bite of an infected mosquito. There is no evidence of ‘horse-to-horse’ or ‘horse-to-person’ transmission of the WNV. Vaccines for other types of equine encephalitis are most likely not effective against WNV.

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HOW CAN RESIDENTS PROTECT THEMSELVES?

  • Reduce mosquito breeding areas on and around your property.
  • Stay indoors at dawn, dusk and early evenings
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants whenever you are outdoors
  • Apply insect repellent containing 20% - 30% DEET to exposed skin or clothing. DEET has been shown to be effective against mosquitoes. Do not apply to children under 3 years of age, and do not apply to hands or face of children. Read and follow directions carefully.

Most importantly, it is essential that all homeowners take action to reduce mosquito breeding areas on private property. Effective mosquito control — on a county-wide basis — depends on each resident doing his or her part.

Mosquito breeding around the home can be greatly reduced by following a few simple guidelines. Note that mosquitoes will lay eggs in ANY container holding water rich in decomposing material (like leaves, grass clippings, etc.) Review this list often!

  • Dispose of / remove old cans, buckets, flower pots or other containers that may collect water
  • Dispose of old discarded tires — these can produce thousands of mosquitoes in just one season
  • Clean out leaves from clogged roof gutters and drains
  • Eliminate water collecting in pool and boat covers
  • Turn over wheelbarrows and wading pools when not in use
  • Do not allow water to stagnate in birdbaths
  • Drain standing puddles, ditches, tree holes or tree stumps

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

For more information about West Nile Virus or Mosquito Control, please contact the
Mosquito and Vector Control Program at (908) 788-1351 or e-mail the
Hunterdon County Vector Control Program Coordinator

Centers for Disease Control: www.cdc.gov

New Jersey Center For Vector Biology
http://vectorbio.rutgers.edu/outreach/

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